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Caitlin Cacciatore

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  • Caitlin Cacciatore
  • December 01, 2017 12:30:45 PM
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A Little About Us

A poetry blog featuring works that will move you, entice you, and stimulate your creative fancy.

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An Update from the Author: September 2020

An update from the desk of Caitlin Cacciatore, September 2020.

Hello friends, family, fellow lovers of language, and assorted followers of this blog,

I hope this update finds you in good health and in good spirits.

I have lots of good news to share – once more, things have been eventful since my last update in July 2020.

I was interviewed by the good folks at Newtown Literary, and was made the featured poetry contributor in New Reader Magazine’s 11th Issue, which you can download for free here. You’ll find my interview on pages 8-9 and my work along with the three beautiful works of art I was paired with on pages 32-37.

A huge thank-you to the editors at Newtown Literary and New Reader Magazine for believing in my work.

You can keep an eye out for more work being published in Albion Review, a journal for university students across the nation whose publication has been delayed due to COVID-19, as well as another poem being published in Breath and Shadow in Spring 2021.

Well, it’s time to sign off. Let me finish by giving a shout-out to the readers who have been with me from the start, including my blog subscribers and everyone else who reads, edits, proofreads, or otherwise supports my creative practice.

A hearty thanks to all and to all a good night,

Caitlin Cacciatore


Writing Prompt of the Week: Summer

Welcome to this edition of Writing Prompt of the Week, which is a bit of a misnomer in that the posts are not exactly weekly and are, in fact, quite sporadic. Be sure to check out last ‘week’s’ writing prompt here! So, without further ado: Write about summer – that August heat; how the songContinue reading "Writing Prompt of the Week:...

Welcome to this edition of Writing Prompt of the Week, which is a bit of a misnomer in that the posts are not exactly weekly and are, in fact, quite sporadic.

Be sure to check out last ‘week’s’ writing prompt here!

So, without further ado: Write about summer – that August heat; how the song of the cicadas pierces the heavy, humid silence every so often; the way the asphalt shimmers and the whole world seems like it’s about to melt. Write about summer love, whether it’s a romance that will withstand the test of time or just a fleeting, fragile thing that fades away once September comes and with it, the chilly promise of autumn.

For those of my readers located in the opposite hemisphere, try writing about the summer from afar – think about the feelings associated with observing a season from a distance; do you long for summer, or dread its coming?

Pepper your work with descriptions. Play with dialogue or try your hand at a new genre. But above all, have fun.

If you are feeling inspired by this prompt, let me know in the comments – whether it’s to share a favorite line of yours or just to drop in and say ‘hi!’


An Update from the Author: July 2020

An Update from the Author, Caitlin Cacciatore - July 2020

Hello friends, family, fellow writers, and valued readers and followers of this blog,

 

So much has happened since my last update in April 2020. 

 

Let me begin by saying that I hope you and your family have been safe and have remained healthy and well and will continue to do so through the duration of the pandemic.

 

My loved ones and I suffered the loss of a family member, and I hope you and your family did not have to go through that pain. My late grandfather was just shy of his 99th birthday, but he lived a good, full, long life. He served this country with pride in WWII, went on to find love and happiness and joy in the years that followed. He died of COVID-19 in mid-March.

 

Many of us have lost family members struck down in the prime of their lives and well before their time, and my heart goes out to everyone who has lost someone recently.

 

When I suffer a loss, many times I find solace in writing. This time was no different. I wrote an elegy for my grandfather, and called it “Sacrament.” When I submitted it to Bacopa Literary Review, I thought to share with the world a relatable and timely ode to the friends and loved ones that many of us have lost recently. I thought that by writing about rallying and raging against the forces of death, I could help others begin to heal from their own losses.

 

I was overjoyed to be published and was astounded and humbled to have won first prize in Poetry in Bacopa Literary Review 2020. 

 

As a new voice on the literary scene, I am so thankful for this recognition of my work.

 

I’ll sign off by saying once more that I wish health and happiness for you and your family.

 

Thank you,

 

Caitlin Cacciatore

 

 


Four More Tips for Beginner Poets

Welcome to the third in this series, Tips for Beginner Poets. You can find the previous two posts here and here. By now, you hopefully have implemented some of the previous tips, and are ready to move on to more advanced techniques.

Welcome to the third in this series, Tips for Beginner Poets. You can find the previous two posts here and here. By now, you hopefully have implemented some of the previous tips, and are ready to move on to more advanced techniques.

 

Tip #9: Don’t be afraid of the blank page.

 

The blank page can be daunting. Every writer, poet, author, or essayist knows this. Try not to be too intimidated by that great expanse of white on the screen, or the unsullied blank sheet of paper. Chances are, you have access to more paper and can fit many hundreds or thousands more Word Documents or Pages onto your hard drive. (In other words, paper is no longer the expensive commodity it used to be, so don’t be afraid of ‘wasting’ it.) See the blank page not as an enemy to conquer, but rather a good friend of yours, full of possibility and wonder. Write something, anything, to start with. Sometimes, the Muses will smile on you and sheer inertia will do the rest; if not, at least you tried.

 

Tip #10: Develop a writing habit/practice/routine.

 

Whatever you want to call it, make writing a priority in your life. Sit in your writing chair, or in a special space you’ve set aside for writing and write for a set period of time. Make space for your writing practice, and try to establish a specific time for your daily writing routine. Try writing when you wake up, or just before you go to bed, or perhaps on your lunch break. No matter when you choose to write, try to be consistent about it, and you’ll see both your output and your creativity begin to blossom more and more.

 

Tip #11: Find inspiration.

 

Go on a long walk, if you can. Take your notebook along, and take notes on the smells, sounds, sights, and any other sensory information you can gather. Alternatively, try going to a nearby museum, or – my personal favorite – visit your local library. If you cannot get out of the house for any reason, try taking a virtual museum tour, reading an ebook, or going to Google Earth, finding a random spot in a far-flung nation, and dropping yourself down into the thick of things. Sometimes, you might end up on a deserted forest road; other times you’ll find yourself in the middle of a megacity. Explore a little bit, then write a poem about the lives of the people and animals who might live there.

 

Tip #12: Diversify.

 

Your poetry writing practice will benefit from writing in other genres, such as fiction, creative non-fiction, essays, or any other genre you can think of. You will gain valuable skills from writing in other genres, and many of these skills will be easily transferable to your poems.


From the Archives: The Knife Edge of Eternity

The speed of time is not a constant, nor can you solve the calculus of life without adding up the joys, taking away the sorrows, and dividing by how much space was left between Zeno’s paradoxes...

There is a poem brewing inside of me

Like a storm.

 

“Who are you?”

The mirror asks,

Yet I cannot reply.

 

Where does one draw the line

Between the rolling thunder

And the lightning that preceded it?

 

The speed of time is not a constant,

Nor can you solve the calculus of life without

Adding up the joys, taking away the sorrows,

And dividing by how much space was left between

Zeno’s paradoxes, and the martyrdom of St. Sebastian,

Who died not from the entrance wounds,

But rather of tripping and falling

Over the knife edge of the eternity it took

For them to halve, and halve again,

The square root of the distance between the archers

And the martyr, who was glad to be taken more than halfway

Between Heaven and Hell.

 

“Who are you?”

Persists the mirror.

 

I answer.

 

“I am you.”


Three More Tips for Beginner Poets

For Tips #1-5, please visit the previous post on my Five Tips for Beginner Poets. That post became so popular that I have decided to make it an ongoing series. Check back regularly for new posts, or subscribe to be notified of new posts!   Tip #6: Always keep a notebook nearby.   One ofContinue reading "Three More Tips for Beginner...

For Tips #1-5, please visit the previous post on my Five Tips for Beginner Poets. That post became so popular that I have decided to make it an ongoing series. Check back regularly for new posts, or subscribe to be notified of new posts!

 

Tip #6: Always keep a notebook nearby.

 

One of the greatest challenges poets and writers face is finding inspiration. You never know when the Muses will gift you with a new idea, so keep a notebook on you at all times – in your bookbag, purse, or briefcase, on your desk, by your bed on the floor or on top of the nightstand, and even consider investing in one of those cool waterproof shower notepads. This way, you won’t ever miss an opportunity to write down an idea once it comes to you.

 

Tip #7: Be receptive to feedback.

 

Another challenge authors sometimes face is writing in a vacuum. If you are fortunate enough to have friends or family who are willing to read your work, ask them for feedback, and be open to whatever they have to say. Read your poems aloud to them, and ask them what works and what doesn’t. If no one you know wishes to read your work, consider starting a blog or an Instagram page for poetry. Ask your readers for feedback. (But don’t fall into the trap of measuring your success in terms of ‘likes,’ which often depend more on how often you post, when you post, and how many followers you have than the actual content of your post.) Once you have gotten some feedback, use it to edit your work.

 

Tip #8: Write all the time.

 

Write prolifically. Write at the beach, and when you’re out and about. Write on the couch, or in bed. Write even when you’re not supposed to be writing. Write whenever you can, wherever you can. (Disclaimer: Please do not write when you are driving or operating heavy machinery, unless you have one of those fancy, entirely hands-free dictation programs, and even then, use caution and your better judgment.) Basically, write and then write some more. If you do, you set yourself up for success, improvement, and all good things.


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