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Artificial Intelligence and Search Engines

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  • 01444 645018
  • Jillian Briggs
  • July 17, 2018 07:44:00 PM
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A Little About Us

The Artemis Marketing blog is an excellent resource for news, information and advice on the world of Search Engine Optimisation and digital marketing. Whether you’re a seasoned SEO expert or looking for tips on the basics of SEO, the Artemis Marketing blog has what you are looking for. The blog is regularly updated by the expert SEO team at Artemis with features, news and more.

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    A beginner’s guide to schema markup for SEO

    What is schema? Schema is a type of structured data that allows search engines to better understand a website, page, or elements on a page. Schema markup is code that can be added to a website to define specific types of information and data. The schema allows search engines to understand and display specific pieces […] The post A beginner’s guide to schema markup for SEO appeared first on Artemis...

    What is schema?

    Schema is a type of structured data that allows search engines to better understand a website, page, or elements on a page. Schema markup is code that can be added to a website to define specific types of information and data. The schema allows search engines to understand and display specific pieces of information in the SERPs, known as rich snippets. These rich snippets are visual and can increase click-through rates as they make your web page stand out from others.

    Different types of schema

    There are hundreds of different types of schema. Which you use will depend on your type of business, what information you have on your website and what you want to promote within the SERPs. Some of the most common types of schema markup include:

    • Organization
    • LocalBusiness
    • Review and AggregateRating
    • Person
    • Q&A / FAQ
    • Products
    • Breadcrumbs
    • Events

    What schema should I use?

    The type of schema markup you use will be determined by a few factors.

    Firstly, your business type. What kind of business you are? If you are a local business mostly serving a geographic area, you should start by using the LocalBusiness schema as this tells Google you operate locally. Whereas if you are an online ecommerce store, you would be more likely to use Organization schema to highlight key contact information.

    Secondly, what kind of information do you have on your website? Do you have Q&A or FAQs? Do you have products? Do you have reviews from Google or use a third-party review website like Trustpilot? Do you run courses or events? This information can all be marked up with schema.

    How do I generate schema and add it to my website?

    Once you’ve decided what information you want to mark up, how do you go about getting the schema code? And how do you add it to your website?

    To generate the Schema code, you can go to the Schema.org website and find the type you are looking for. This can be a bit overwhelming, so an easier way to create the code is to use one of the ‘schema markup generator tools’ that are available online – these create the schema for you. There is also a Google markup tool you can use to help create schema based on page items. You can also take a look at one of our previous blog posts by my colleague Sara to see examples of what the schema code actually looks like.

    Schema is available in different formats; JSON-LD, Microdata and RDFa. At Artemis we use JSON-LD for all of our clients.

    Once you have the code ready, you can test that it works in the Google Structured Data Testing Tool. Run the schema through the code snippet and it will highlight any errors or warnings. Once any errors or warnings have been fixed, you are ready to add the schema to your website. We would recommend testing the schema again once it is live.

    You can also monitor schema in Google Search Console, and there have recently been some new reports launched that allow you to keep an eye on the following; FAQ, how-to, events, products, logo, recipes schema and more.

    Examples of rich snippets in Google

    Here’s a few examples of websites using schema effectively, producing rich snippets in the SERPs:

    1. John Lewis using Product and Review schema to highlight price, availability and product rating:

     

    2. Into The Blue using FAQ and AggregateRating schema:

     

    3. Songkick using event schema for upcoming concerts:

     

    4. BBC Good Food using recipe schema:

     

    Schema can be a bit fiddly at times, but the more you use it, the easier it gets. If you have any questions about schema or would like some help with adding schema to your website, we’d love to hear from you.

    The post A beginner’s guide to schema markup for SEO appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Kangaroos charity raise £663 at quiz night

    Artemis were delighted to support Kangaroos at their latest charity quiz night at the Savannah Café Bar in Haywards Heath last night. The café was packed out with supporters all desperate to show off their quiz prowess and support Kangaroos. We were really happy to be involved in raising awareness of the amazing work the […] The post Kangaroos charity raise £663 at quiz night appeared first on Artemis...

    Artemis were delighted to support Kangaroos at their latest charity quiz night at the Savannah Café Bar in Haywards Heath last night. The café was packed out with supporters all desperate to show off their quiz prowess and support Kangaroos.

    We were really happy to be involved in raising awareness of the amazing work the charity does in running clubs and fun activities for children and young adults in Sussex with learning disabilities. It was great to see some of the Kangaroos’ parents at the event too.

    This year is the charity’s 25th anniversary year and fundraising has been stepped up to raise an extra £100,000 to provide members with an amazing ‘Memory of a Lifetime’ experience. Overnight trips to Disneyland Paris, Centerparcs and Alton Towers have been arranged, as well as some great day trips to London and other places for those not confident enough to spend nights away from parents and home. This is truly an exciting and great year for all of the Kangaroos members.

    The quiz night was a resounding success and raised a whopping £663.50. Artemis were delighted to donate a party hamper filled with snacks and drinks fit for any summer barbecue. It made first prize in the raffle and was gratefully received by the raffle winners. We were also pleased to provide a bag of goodies for the forthcoming parents and carers pamper event.

    As far as quiz nights go, we’ve done better! We started the evening with aplomb, playing blinders in the first two rounds, but things slowly started to go downhill (I blame the distraction of food). Our Mid Sussex knowledge definitely needs work, but we made up points in our last round on music. We may not have won the first prize, but one of our teams did get a surprise consolation (6 bottles of wine) – and no we weren’t last (just)!

    Well done and thanks to the Artemis quizzers! I hope you’ll agree a good night was had by all. We will continue to support Kangaroos, our charity of choice. Our Artemis golfers are looking forward to defending their title at the Kangaroos charity golf event at Mid-Sussex golf club on 10th May. We are also planning a sponsored walk to tie in with our new Health & Well-being at work initiative soon!

    The post Kangaroos charity raise £663 at quiz night appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Five key takeaways from BrightonSEO 2019

    A number of the Artemis team attended BrightonSEO on April 12th 2019 and came away with a number of fascinating insights into the trends surrounding the industry. Here, Account Director, Tom Hart, provides his five key takeaways from the conference. 1. You can’t ‘do’ SEO without using developers Unless you are an incredibly technical SEO, […] The post Five key takeaways from BrightonSEO 2019 appeared first on Artemis...

    A number of the Artemis team attended BrightonSEO on April 12th 2019 and came away with a number of fascinating insights into the trends surrounding the industry. Here, Account Director, Tom Hart, provides his five key takeaways from the conference.

    Brighton SEO

    1. You can’t ‘do’ SEO without using developers

    Unless you are an incredibly technical SEO, you cannot work successfully on a website without the help of a developer. And not just any developer, it has to be a developer who understands what you need and can implement it without causing any issues to the site.

    Polly Pospelova’s talk on trying to hit a 100% Lighthouse report score really drove this home.  The recommendations that come out of a Lighthouse report are not ones that your average SEO will be able to handle.  So, having a developer on hand to make those changes isn’t just a nice to have it is necessary in order to be proficient at SEO in 2019.

    2. Leads can come from anywhere

    Gregg Gifford who always delivers high energy, relevant and insightful talks, was again on point. Those of you who have seen him speak before will know he isn’t somebody you want to miss.

    Along with being a great speaker he really knows his stuff and there are invariably going to be takeaways from his talks that you didn’t necessarily realise before. He showed how 40% of the questions in the Q&A area on one of his clients GMB pages were actually leads. With such a high percentage of leads coming from this avenue it is vital to make sure these are being tracked and dealt with.

    3. The takeover of voice search

    Is voice search actually taking over?  There seemed to be very little mention of voice search in the talks I was present in. This might be slightly surprising given the figures that are banded around when people want to argue about voice search.

    Maybe it wasn’t mentioned because people are still not sure how to optimise for it. Maybe the traffic you get from voice search has little value in terms of conversions. Or maybe it just isn’t growing at the rate we are led to believe. In John Mueller’s keynote session he was indicating that a lot of voice searches are still very simplistic or even commands to your device, ‘what is the time’, ‘play Spotify’ or ‘what is the weather forecast’.  It seems we may still be some way from a full-blown voice search generation.

    Talk at BrightonSEO

    4. Where were the mentions of mobile?

    While with voice search I can understand why it wasn’t really mentioned, but are people really still ignoring mobile? A lot of slides that I saw just gave examples of websites on desktop screens even now when we so clearly live in a mobile-first world.

    Anybody not taking mobile search seriously isn’t taking SEO seriously.  It doesn’t matter if you still get the majority of your traffic through desktop it is the mobile version of your website that you need to concentrate on.

    5. John Mueller is a black belt in giving nothing away

    Last year’s keynote session with John Mueller was a procession of inane questions that he could quite easily bat away without revealing anything. Somebody even asked is Google male or female. You have somebody who works in the inner sanctums of Google, is that really the best question to ask him!?

    This year was far better and the questions that were put to him far more insightful and probing. There were numerous silences where you could see John didn’t immediately know how to answer. And while he maybe expected the questions, Hannah Smith did a great job of not letting him off the hook too easily. He did however, with great skill and poise, manage to say a lot, but reveal very little.

     

     

     

     

     

    The post Five key takeaways from BrightonSEO 2019 appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Copywriter or Content Writer – what’s the difference?

    Does your marketing strategy need the services of a copywriter or a content writer? If you didn’t realise there was a difference, you’re not alone. Many businesses believe that they’re just two names for the same thing – but they’re wrong. When it comes to hiring a writer for your online content, it’s important to […] The post Copywriter or Content Writer – what’s the difference? appeared first on Artemis...

    Does your marketing strategy need the services of a copywriter or a content writer? If you didn’t realise there was a difference, you’re not alone. Many businesses believe that they’re just two names for the same thing – but they’re wrong.

    When it comes to hiring a writer for your online content, it’s important to understand that the role of a copywriter and that of a content writer is actually quite different. In order to fulfil your marketing objectives, it’s important to choose the right tool for the job.

    The Art of Copywriting

    Copywriting predates the digital world by several decades. Firmly rooted in the world of old-school sales and marketing, copywriters are masters of persuasion. Their huge commercial value came to be increasingly recognised by sales hungry companies and advertising agencies whose influence on consumer behaviour started taking on a new intensity from the 1950s onwards.

    The fundamental skill of the copywriter lies in being able to use words and language to convince the reader to take an action, whether in the shape of sales copy, marketing emails, print advertising, brochures, digital ads or landing pages. Short form or long form, essentially it’s sales oriented writing with one ultimate goal in mind: to get the customer to make a purchase.

    Here are three great examples:

    Image source: Auto Evolution

    Image source: Inner Media

    Image source: Web Designer Depot

    In terms of online copy, a copywriter will use his writing skills to produce landing pages, product pages, services pages, brochure downloads, checkout pages… in fact any web page that constitutes a touch point where the user is urged to respond to a call to action, or that helps to usher him towards a purchase. This is where a great copywriter can make all the difference to increase conversion rates and drive sales.

    Choose your copywriter carefully. Do you need someone who specialises in product copy, direct response advertising or SEO copy? Are you looking for specific industry expertise? A good copywriter should understand your marketing goals, take your brief and turn it into a creative solution that connects with the target market, using emotion and humour as necessary to persuade them to take action.

    So, what does a Content Writer do?

    The job of content writing has evolved along with the growth of digital marketing, ‘content’ being what a web page is filled with. More than that, in addition to writing content for specific sites, content writers are also responsible for 90% of what you read online, through social media marketing, online magazines and blog posts.

    In contrast to sales focused copywriting, content writing is aimed higher up the sales funnel, aimed at increasing brand awareness, maintaining brand image and generating customer engagement through informative and entertaining content. The writing is subtly positioned in such a way as to strengthen the relationship between the reader and the brand.

    Rather than majoring on the features and benefits offered by a particular product or company, a great content writer will instead develop strategies that tap into the target audience’s concerns and requirements. The trick is to provide the information and advice that people are actively looking for, in an easily accessible way. Content can be created for many channels including websites and blogs, email and social media.

    Image source: Redscan

    The skill of a content writer goes beyond that of being an excellent wordsmith – that’s a given. In order to execute successful digital marketing campaigns, the writer must also have a keen understanding of what drives online search behaviour, including how to use keywords and phrases and linkbuilding campaigns to enhance SEO performance.

    It’s a mixture of a highly creative and analytical approach targeted at engaging online readers with notoriously short attention spans. Success, then, is measured in terms of how long readers stay on the page and the extent to which they comment on and/or share what they’ve read online.

    Don’t you need both?

    In a word, yes. You would be hard pressed to find a business environment these days that doesn’t rely on both copywriting and content writing to get their marketing messages across. Good content writing lies at the core of producing quality blogs posts, articles and website content to drive customer engagement. Copywriting tactics should be applied to intensify and convert this engagement and drive sales.

     

    The post Copywriter or Content Writer – what’s the difference? appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Why does UX matter so much on mobile?

    In today’s blog, Artemis SEO Manager Kerry Jones examines website user experience (UX) and takes a closer look at why it matters so much on mobile. Your website may be responsive, but is it truly mobile-friendly? With Google’s switch over to mobile first indexing, user experience on mobile devices has become one of the most […] The post Why does UX matter so much on mobile? appeared first on Artemis...

    In today’s blog, Artemis SEO Manager Kerry Jones examines website user experience (UX) and takes a closer look at why it matters so much on mobile.

    Your website may be responsive, but is it truly mobile-friendly?

    With Google’s switch over to mobile first indexing, user experience on mobile devices has become one of the most important factors to consider when optimising a website.

    “The limited screen size on mobiles has required a complete rethink as to how content is displayed on websites. Google is adapting its search results based on how mobile pages are set up. As Google’s understanding of how users interact with mobile pages improves, an increased focus on mobile usability is absolutely fundamental for search success going forward. With the Chrome browser, Google has usability data across all pages of a website. Mobile usability is a key factor in 2019.” Justin Aldridge, Technical Director at Artemis

    Mobile vs. desktop

    With an increasing number of searches performed on mobile vs desktop over recent years, now is definitely the time to take action on mobile to improve it as much as possible.

    You might be thinking “how does this apply to me when 80% of my traffic comes from desktop?” Well Google will still index the mobile version of your website first, meaning that desktop rankings are deciphered from mobile and if your website doesn’t provide a good mobile user experience, then your desktop rankings are likely to suffer.

     

    How does Google know if a website provides a poor user experience?

    Google has access to website usage and engagement statistics, including the average time users spend on page/site, page interactions and bounce rates. If these statistics aren’t as good as your competitors, then Google may favour those better performing websites.

    Things to consider on mobile:

    • Does the website load quickly in Wi-Fi as well as 3G and 4G?
    • Is the header condensed for mobile? Or does it take up the whole device landing screen forcing users to scroll down to see content/images?
    • Is the menu visible on all pages? Are all key pages accessible from it?
    • Is content readable or too small?
    • Are contact and sign up forms optimised for mobile?
    • Is the search functionality visible and does it use typing suggestions?
    • Does the website make sure of read more tabs where necessary to prevent endless paragraphs of text?

    There are various ways you can review your mobile usability:

    1. Firstly, perform some tasks on your mobile that you would expect your customers to do, for example, adding a product to cart and going through the checkout process, or filling out a contact form to see if there are any obvious issues.
    2. Check for any mobile usability issues reported in Google Search Console. This section will point out instances whereby clickable elements are too close together, where the content has fallen off the screen, plus much more. You can also run the website through the Google Mobile-Friendly
    3. Run a Google Lighthouse report on the website. This will provide speed improvement recommendations as well as accessibility, best practice and SEO considerations.
    4. Set up Hotjar heatmaps to monitor mobile user behaviour and see what people are clicking on and how far they are scrolling down the page. Record users to find any common pitfalls or annoyances. Take a look at our blog post on how to turn visitors into customers on Hotjar here.
    5. Review Google Analytics for high exit pages on mobile devices, then go and check these on mobile to find out why users are leaving the site.

    Google’s Playbooks for retail or lead gen websites are great resources to refer to whilst reviewing the UX of a website.

    If you’re interested in ensuring your website has a UX that is optimised for mobile, Artemis offers a mobile first audit.

    The post Why does UX matter so much on mobile? appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    The dos and don’ts of reporting

    At Artemis, we provide our clients with a completely open and transparent working process. This means that we submit relevant monthly reports with details of all of the work that we have carried out over the month, as well as information on how this work has affected rankings, conversions and a full range of other […] The post The dos and don’ts of reporting appeared first on Artemis...

    At Artemis, we provide our clients with a completely open and transparent working process. This means that we submit relevant monthly reports with details of all of the work that we have carried out over the month, as well as information on how this work has affected rankings, conversions and a full range of other metrics.

    Here Artemis Finance Supervisor Narciso Baldo sets out some of the dos and don’ts of reporting.

    The Dos

    Make it relevant

    You have to make reporting relevant to the stakeholder, there’s no point sending a report on the general office expenses to the HR department. Focus on creating a report that is going to be beneficial to the person who is going to read it.

    Keep it concise

    People don’t like long reports, even if they’re interesting people don’t hold long attention spans. Keep reporting as concise and to the point as possible to ensure that information is imparted.

    Use correct language

    Reporting should be formal and professional. It is best to stay away from slang and writing in the first person. You should also proofread the report multiple times to make sure that you have not repeated yourself. The language should be neutral and objective.

    Keep it timely

    There’s no point sending reports that are out of date. Make sure your reporting is current and fresh otherwise it will be redundant and obsolete.

    The Don’ts

    Don’t have spelling errors

    You simply can’t send reports with errors. Doing so reflects poorly on you and the organisation and shows a lack of attention to detail. There’s no reason why report should ever have a spelling error when we all have spell checks.

    Don’t miss deadlines

    Everyone is busy and needs reports at the right times. Is there ever a legitimate excuse to send a report after the deadline?

    Don’t forget the contents page

    Readers like to know where to look, it might be simple, but you have to include a contents page so the reader knows where to look for specific parts.

    Don’t have important text straddling pages

    Formatting is crucial to how a report reads. If you have parts straddling pages, it shows you haven’t taken the time to properly format your report and looks shoddy. Text should be easily readable and structured well so you don’t have to turn the page for the same part.

    The post The dos and don’ts of reporting appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


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