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Artificial Intelligence and Search Engines

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  • 01444 645018
  • Jillian Briggs
  • July 17, 2018 03:44:00 PM
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A Little About Us

The Artemis Marketing blog is an excellent resource for news, information and advice on the world of Search Engine Optimisation and digital marketing. Whether you’re a seasoned SEO expert or looking for tips on the basics of SEO, the Artemis Marketing blog has what you are looking for. The blog is regularly updated by the expert SEO team at Artemis with features, news and more.

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    The dos and don’ts of reporting

    At Artemis, we provide our clients with a completely open and transparent working process. This means that we submit relevant monthly reports with details of all of the work that we have carried out over the month, as well as information on how this work has affected rankings, conversions and a full range of other […] The post The dos and don’ts of reporting appeared first on Artemis...

    At Artemis, we provide our clients with a completely open and transparent working process. This means that we submit relevant monthly reports with details of all of the work that we have carried out over the month, as well as information on how this work has affected rankings, conversions and a full range of other metrics.

    Here Artemis Finance Supervisor Narciso Baldo sets out some of the dos and don’ts of reporting.

    The Dos

    Make it relevant

    You have to make reporting relevant to the stakeholder, there’s no point sending a report on the general office expenses to the HR department. Focus on creating a report that is going to be beneficial to the person who is going to read it.

    Keep it concise

    People don’t like long reports, even if they’re interesting people don’t hold long attention spans. Keep reporting as concise and to the point as possible to ensure that information is imparted.

    Use correct language

    Reporting should be formal and professional. It is best to stay away from slang and writing in the first person. You should also proofread the report multiple times to make sure that you have not repeated yourself. The language should be neutral and objective.

    Keep it timely

    There’s no point sending reports that are out of date. Make sure your reporting is current and fresh otherwise it will be redundant and obsolete.

    The Don’ts

    Don’t have spelling errors

    You simply can’t send reports with errors. Doing so reflects poorly on you and the organisation and shows a lack of attention to detail. There’s no reason why report should ever have a spelling error when we all have spell checks.

    Don’t miss deadlines

    Everyone is busy and needs reports at the right times. Is there ever a legitimate excuse to send a report after the deadline?

    Don’t forget the contents page

    Readers like to know where to look, it might be simple, but you have to include a contents page so the reader knows where to look for specific parts.

    Don’t have important text straddling pages

    Formatting is crucial to how a report reads. If you have parts straddling pages, it shows you haven’t taken the time to properly format your report and looks shoddy. Text should be easily readable and structured well so you don’t have to turn the page for the same part.

    The post The dos and don’ts of reporting appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    What is your bounce rate and why is it important for SEO?

    If you’re a small or medium-sized business owner you may not have come across the term ‘bounce rate’ or you may have noticed it on your Google Analytics web stats. The reason why bounce rate has always featured so prominently on top line web stats is because it’s a key indication on how engaging your […] The post What is your bounce rate and why is it important for SEO? appeared first on Artemis...

    If you’re a small or medium-sized business owner you may not have come across the term ‘bounce rate’ or you may have noticed it on your Google Analytics web stats. The reason why bounce rate has always featured so prominently on top line web stats is because it’s a key indication on how engaging your web pages are to visitors. And this has an impact on SEO.

    Bounce rate explained

    The bounce rate of your website – or a particular page – is the percentage of users who leave the web page they landed on without any kind of interaction with it. No clicks; they simply arrive, decide it’s not what they wanted to see and leave, looking for a more suitable resource.

    For this reason, bounce rate is a measure of the quality of a user’s visit and a high bounce rate indicates that the pages people are landing on – your ‘landing pages’ – aren’t relevant to them.

    A website’s bounce rate is displayed as a percentage: the total number of sessions viewing the site and leaving without any interaction is divided by the total number of page views for a given time period. In simple terms, a high bounce rate is bad and a low bounce rate is good!

    In Google Analytics, you will see an overall bounce rate for your website displayed in your top line stats and a report that shows which pages have the highest individual bounce rates.

    Bounce rate vs. exit rate

    Bounce rate is different from exit rate because it measures people who leave without visiting any other pages on your website. An exit rate for a page refers to visitors who leave your site from a particular page, after coming to that page from somewhere else on your site.

    A common example of a bounce is someone who lands on your home page from the search results and hits the back button on their browser pretty much straight away. If they clicked on your products page then left the site, the visit would show as an exit from the product page and not a bounce because they’ve visited two pages on your site.

    What counts as a bounce?

    You may be surprised what counts as a bounce. We’ve already mentioned clicking the back button but there are a number of things a user can do which will also count. If they close the window or tab, that counts. Typing a new URL in the address bar does too. So, does clicking on a link to another website from within your page. They are all ways of leaving your website without interaction.

    How it impacts SEO

    Google uses a complex set of metrics when ranking web pages but its own user data is pretty critical.  Both bounce and exit rate are strong indicators of a web page’s quality and ‘stickiness’ – and Google’s primary aim is to serve up the best quality and most relevant pages in its search engine results pages (SERPS). If your pages have a high bounce rate, it means they’re not relevant to the search terms users typed – and will be less likely to rank well. Conversely, if the bounce rate is low, it means users are spending time on your page, finding content to engage in and exploring your site further.

    What is a good bounce rate?

    Every industry is different so we can’t give a blanket answer to this. Instead you should compare your web metrics with other sites in your industry.  Shopping websites tend to have lower bounce rates as people are more inclined to browse products, whereas a specific geographical landing page for a service industry which contains all the information users need on that page will have a significantly higher rate. This also applies if your website is a simple one-page site. As a guide:

    • Retail sites should aim for 20-40%
    • Service industry sites (e.g. Financial services) should aim for 10-30%
    • Content sites should aim for 40-60%
    • Landing pages should aim for 70-90%

    What can I do to improve my website?

    As a first step to improving your website bounce rate you should identify which pages on your website users land on most frequently. You can do this in Google Analytics. These are the pages you should focus on to do the following things:

    • Ensure the content on the page is relevant and engaging – you may consider rewriting it, breaking it up, adding images or video and links to other relevant content. Ensure there is enough detail for users if they want it. If you’re worried about having too much visible content on the page, you can use ‘read more’ links.
    • Ensure the design of the page is engaging – clear layout, easy to read font, clear journey through the page and jumps off to relevant content. Perhaps get someone who’s never seen the page to take a test drive through it.
    • Ensure any links to external sites open in a new window by using the target=”_blank” attribute in your links.
    • Link to a glossary that explains industry terms or a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
    • Ensure the page loads quickly. We recommend aiming for a 5 second page load time. To measure this, use a tool like GT Metrix or Google’s own Page Speed Checker (NB this will check your mobile page speed as Google now looks at mobile ahead of desktop).
    • Get rid of any pop-up ads – they annoy users.
    • If your page has adverts, consider where they’re placed. Too many, too prominently on the page are a turn off.
    • Check that your site navigation is clear and the user journey through the website is planned out.
    • Include plenty of internal links to other, useful pages on your website – e.g. similar products and services, customer reviews, relevant blog or news posts and contact page
    • Include clear calls to action (CTAs) as buttons or banners to prompt users to click on them.

    If you implement the above points on your key pages, you will not only improve your bounce rate but also the SEO for that page – and in turn should see more users from organic search. But remember, nothing happens overnight so keep checking those web metrics every month!

    The post What is your bounce rate and why is it important for SEO? appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Do you actually own your website?

    Website ownership is a complex subject which often does not receive enough attention from business owners, probably due to the technical nature of the matter. There are many instances where a business owner loses control of their website, and in some cases, forever. Or they may find themselves in a situation where they have to […] The post Do you actually own your website? appeared first on Artemis...

    Website ownership is a complex subject which often does not receive enough attention from business owners, probably due to the technical nature of the matter.

    There are many instances where a business owner loses control of their website, and in some cases, forever. Or they may find themselves in a situation where they have to pay a significant ‘ransom’ to their previous developer to be able to access the site which they believed was theirs.

    A website is a valuable business asset that represents the brand online, and it is protected by various intellectual property laws, such as trademark, database, and copyright law. Losing control of your website can lead to a number of disastrous consequences, such as loss of property rights, loss of rankings, loss of historical data, and ultimately result in serious financial implications.

    The different components of a website

    In order to fully understand who owns or controls a website, it is important to understand the elements that make up a website. One part of a website is what a visitor to a web page sees on their screen, and the other part is the technology behind it that makes the website visible online. The first part consists of the text, images, layout, colours, and other visual design elements.

    The second part consists of the programming code and the software that support the visual layout, and also the online hosting of the files containing them so they are accessible via the Internet. Most of these elements are governed by copyright law.

    You or your web designer?

    One of the common misconceptions is that you become an owner of the website elements created by the web designer you contracted and paid to do the work. Usually this is not the case, as the contractor will continue to own the copyright in the product they created, indefinitely, unless stated otherwise in the contract. To complicate the matters even further, some elements of a website cannot be owned, but are licenced to the end user.

    The customer should always check the Web Development Agreement, preferably with a specialist lawyer, to ensure that they will in fact retain full control of all website elements designed by the developer even after the contract with the developer terminates. As with anything else, it is up to the customer to understand what it is exactly that they are getting for their money and on what terms.

    There are many reported cases where a web development company would offer a low-cost monthly instalment plan to design and host a website, but if a customer terminates, they suddenly find themselves unable to access their website as the rights to it still belong with the developer. A developer might ask for a hefty payment to hand the site over, but failing that the only solution is to rebuild a website from scratch – provided the customer is the registered user of the domain name.

    Do you own your domain?

    Domain name registration is perhaps the most valuable element of a website. There are many business owners who have unsuspectingly lost access to their domain name, either because they did not renew registration or because they were not the registered owner in the first place. The domain name cannot be owned, it can only be used exclusively for an annual fee. Unfortunately, sometimes an unscrupulous web developer might register the domain name not in the name of the customer but their own name and hold your website hostage.

    The easy check on https://www.whois.com/whois/ will confirm if you are in fact a registered user of your domain name. If you are not, immediate action needs to be taken to remedy the situation. Depending on the circumstances of the claim, it may be even necessary to file a domain name dispute with the World Intellectual Property Organisation. If the domain name cannot be recovered, the brand’s online footprint will be erased resulting in a long-lasting damaging effect on the business.

    What about the host…

    If you are satisfied that you have the rights to your domain name and your website files, another element to consider is web hosting. A hosting company is needed to store your website files on their server from where it will be accessible to online users.

    Again, a Hosting Agreement needs to be carefully checked, making sure that you are not being locked into a long-term plan with no termination rights, that the company will assist with moving your files from or to another hosting company, and provide adequate security and a backup of data, to name just a few important points. Again, it is best to check the contract with a specialist lawyer as unwanted consequences are likely to be long-lasting and costly.

    To summarise the above, on a practical level a website owner should have the following:

    Domain Name registration and annual renewals in place

    • A satisfactory Web Development Agreement
    • A satisfactory Web Hosting Agreement
    • Access details for your website’s admin control panel
    • Access details for your website’s hosting account
    • Access to any additional software if it was used (such as plugins, theme updates, etc)
    • Access to analytical data (such as Google Analytics and Search Console)

     

    If you have any questions about your website please contact us for further information.

    The post Do you actually own your website? appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Why keywords are still the key to your website success in 2019

    The purpose of this post is to give an overview of why keywords are still so important, for business owners or marketers without a detailed SEO knowledge. I was inspired to write this post, as I regularly see new clients’ websites that are missing the most basic keywords, even those who have previously hired an […] The post Why keywords are still the key to your website success in 2019 appeared first on Artemis...

    The purpose of this post is to give an overview of why keywords are still so important, for business owners or marketers without a detailed SEO knowledge.

    I was inspired to write this post, as I regularly see new clients’ websites that are missing the most basic keywords, even those who have previously hired an SEO agency.

    • Many things are written about the keys to a website search engine success in 2019, for example this blog post lists over 200 factors that Google considers.
    • It is worth taking a step back to look at the function Google provides. If someone types in (or speaks) their query, like “plumber in Brighton”; Google’s algorithm looks at all the web pages in its index and serves what it considers to be the ‘best’ results.
    • While Google looks at over 200 factors, if you are a plumber in Brighton, you are certainly going to make your job of achieving top ranking much harder if you do not have ‘plumber’ or ‘brighton’ written on relevant web pages.

    So, despite all of Google’s advances since it was founded in 1998, keywords are still the key to websites’ success, here are the six reasons why:

    1. People still search using words

    Despite technology advances, people still search using words, whether typing on mobile, desktop or using voice search. Words are therefore the basis of every search.

    2. Keywords relate to 11 of the 59 page factors that Google looks at for rankings

    According to Google’s 200 Ranking Factors: The Complete List (2018), keywords are directly related to 11 of the 59 on page factors that Google looks at when deciding where to rank your website in its natural listings. So, defining the right keywords in the correct places are still extremely important for your website’s rankings.

    3. Google makes its money from keywords

    In 2017, ads accounted for over 70% of Google total $111 Billion revenue, and 89% of this ad revenue came from ads in their search results.

    The ads in their search results work on a keyword cost per click model. So, the advertiser will bid on a keyword they wish to rank for, and the more commercially viable that keyword the more they will bid. So, it is worth remembering that keywords drive Google’s income, so they are going nowhere!

    4. Keywords help your website to clearly define what you are selling

    The right keywords can help you to clearly and succinctly define your product or services, from the more general such as ‘plumber’ to the highly specific such as ‘Emergency boiler repairs in Brighton’.

    So, for example if you where this firm of plumbers:

    • Home Page – this should include more general keywords such a ‘plumbers’ and maybe your locations
    • Services pages – you should have an ‘Emergency Boiler Repairs’ page and maybe your locations

    For further details on how to structure your website, see: How to Create a Site Structure That Will Enhance SEO.

    5. Keyword research helps you match your site to what searchers are looking for

    Google provides data to the precise search queries people use. Tools like Keywords Everywhere make accessing this data quick and simple.

    Knowing the number of searches for one keyword versus another can be extremely informative in how you write and structure your website.

    Let’s say you are a firm of plumbers and you offer ‘boiler installations’ and ‘heat pump installations’ but Google tells you that there are no searches for ‘heat pump installations’ in your area, this tells you to focus more efforts on the ‘boiler installation’ content on your website. See actual results:

    • boiler installer brighton: 30 Google searches a month
    • heat pump installer brighton: 0 Google searches a month

    For more information see:  How to Do Keyword Research for SEO: A Beginner’s Guide.

    6. Keyword research helps you target more commercially viable search terms

    As Google makes money from selling Ads and knows the price people will bid for specific keywords. This gives you as a website owner extremely valuable information as to the commercial viability of a keyword.

    Let’s say you were considering two pages on your plumbing website, one about your Emergency Plumbing Services, and one about Small Plumbing jobs. But the cost per click for the two search terms where as follows:

    • emergency plumbers brighton: £12.74 per click
    • small job plumber brighton: £2.03 per click

    This indicates that ’emergency plumbers brighton’ is a much more commercially viable term, and that your site will generate higher value enquiries if you spend more time optimising writing content for ‘emergency plumber’ related keywords.

    For further reading, see Google AdWords: The Beginner’s Guide.

     

    If you have any comments please leave a comment below.

    Or if you feel that your business website is lacking good keyword targeting, call us on 01444 645018 for a FREE initial chat, or for more information see our SEO page.

    The post Why keywords are still the key to your website success in 2019 appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Account Director Tom Hart: My First Year at Artemis

    Account Director Tom Hart has had an exciting first year at Artemis. In this blog he shares his experiences and thoughts from working at the company: Since joining Artemis just over a year ago I thought it was a good time to look back and reflect on my time here so far. There are some […] The post Account Director Tom Hart: My First Year at Artemis appeared first on Artemis...

    Account Director Tom Hart has had an exciting first year at Artemis. In this blog he shares his experiences and thoughts from working at the company:

    Artemis yachting day

    Since joining Artemis just over a year ago I thought it was a good time to look back and reflect on my time here so far.

    There are some clever people out there

    My previous roles have been full of great people who give everything to make the job and the company a success. At Artemis we have a company full of that but also some insanely clever people.  And surrounding yourself with people like this can only help. I learn more in half an hour of watching our Technical Director work than I possibly could reading any SEO books.

    Never stop learning

    One of the things I enjoy most is that SEO it always evolving and never stands still. Every day Google is tweaking and refining the algorithms that determine search results meaning if you stop learning you get left behind, quickly. Of course, Google engineers will never reveal, and in the modern world of AI, perhaps don’t even know, how to make a website rank well. So, you have to take it upon yourself to do everything you can to keep up to date with how search engines are evolving.

    Kangaroos Charity Golf Day - Tom Hart 3

    Working for a good company

    As a company we sponsor Kangaroos, a local charity who do fantastic work with local children who have learning difficulties. We have done various events through the year which has helped them raise a great amount of money which allows them to keep delivering the invaluable opportunities and days out for the local children. So far, we have taken part in a bike ride (25 miles almost broke me), a golf day (which I won and made paper, casual) and a picnic and cake sale (thoroughly enjoyable).

    Take every opportunity you can

    If a company is willing to invest in you and help you excel take it, both as a person and an employee.  At Artemis we want all our staff to push themselves and succeed, so training sessions and business coaching is a regular thing. Both external and internal training takes place regularly. Pretty much the whole office now has their own personal websites that have built from scratch with the help of the technical team.

    Kangaroos - Team Artemis

    The post Account Director Tom Hart: My First Year at Artemis appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


    Using PPC data to inform SEO

    Traditionally, SEO and PPC have been seen as very separate entities – rivals competing a bigger slice of the digital marketing budget in any given organisation. Your company’s organic search specialists will argue that SEO is a long-term strategy with better value for money and lasting effects that make a difference for your business. But […] The post Using PPC data to inform SEO appeared first on Artemis...

    Traditionally, SEO and PPC have been seen as very separate entities – rivals competing a bigger slice of the digital marketing budget in any given organisation. Your company’s organic search specialists will argue that SEO is a long-term strategy with better value for money and lasting effects that make a difference for your business. But those interested in paid search will counter: PPC is immediate, and it always gets results.

    Of course, they are both right: SEO and PPC can each be effective strategies and can often work harmoniously for a holistic approach to digital marketing. But it is perhaps not recognised often enough that aside from working together – there is actually much that SEOs can learn from PPC practice and data.

    Lack of communication between SEO and PPC specialists can be a hinderance to the success of a business. So, in this blog we will take a look at how your SEO department can utilise PPC data and insights effectively.

    Learn faster than SEO

    As has been mentioned, PPC is typically seen as a ‘faster’ form of digital marketing. This is due to the fact that while the SEO work you do on a website can take months before you see a significant improvement in your rankings (and therefore, traffic and sales), PPC ads can bring in customers in minutes.

    Clearly, then, there is an opportunity for SEOs to learn where they need to target their next campaign. For example, if your business is moving into a new product area, using PPC ads can tell you very quickly the kinds of products and pages that work successfully. Test product pages individually to see which ones perform the best. Long-term SEO can then be planned around these pages, as there may be more potential for conversions in them.

    Understanding the metrics

    PPC data can provide you with an absolute gold mine of useful information on how pages perform. Click through rate and conversion rate are two vital metrics that can be extremely easily tracked through a PPC campaign – you can take many insights from the campaign.

    Look for pages with a high click-through rate but a low conversion rate. It may be the case that the advert here is misleading, so when visitors click through, they don’t find what they are looking for. Alternatively, it may be the case that the advert piqued the interest of the visitor, but the page failed to live up to expectations. These can offer great opportunities to improve these pages.

    Check how your high click-through/low conversion pages fair through organic traffic – if the conversion rate is low here then the problem is clearly with the page. Low quality pages can be a big problem for long-term SEO – and simply by comparing the PPC data with organic data you can learn whether a page is a problem, or if the issue is elsewhere.

    Useful reports

    It was once easy to understand which search terms were generating the most revenue for your business. However, updates to Google Analytics made it far more challenge to access this data in a meaningful and useful way. It has become necessary for SEOs to effectively take an educated guess in order to establish the best converting keywords for their site.

    However, if you are also running a PPC campaign then there is no need to guess. A PPC specialist will be able to easily obtain a search term report for your account that will include a full range of useful metrics including, impressions, CTR and, yes, conversion rate!

    You can then take this useful data and understand which terms are the most effective. This is just one example of PPCs sometimes having access to information that a pure SEO specialist might not realise is available.

    Practical examples for how you can use PPC data to inform SEO

    There are plenty of practical of examples of things that the SEO team can start doing immediately in order to benefit from PPC insights.

    1. Faster A/B testing – we have already mentioned that one of the major benefits of PPC over SEO is that it works faster. This gives you the opportunity to carry out any important A/B testing at a much faster rate than what would be possible for SEO. While SEO A/B tests might take weeks or even months to come up with preferred options, PPC campaigns can find out in days.
    2. Use best performing ad copy to inform meta titles and descriptions – it is also worth noting that when a particular PPC advert works well, it can be sensible to use this to inform meta titles and descriptions. If a PPC ad that mentions ‘award winning service’ and it is performing above better than other ads, then it is definitely worth using this phrasing in your meta description.
    3. Calls-to-action – getting your calls-to-action right can make a huge difference to the success of a site. PPC ads tend to use a much broader variety of CTAs than standard pages, so they are constantly testing their effectiveness. Take a look at which CTAs convert best, and then roll them out.

    But… be aware of the pitfalls

    Of course, there is the potential to be ‘false positives’ within PPC data that, when applied to the site generally as an organic search tactic, will not be effective. There can be many reasons for this – perhaps visitors coming to your site through CTA-heavy adverts are more primed to convert than a visitor casually searching on a term you rank well for.

    The best advice then is to take ‘too good to be true’ data with a pinch of salt. What works for PPC often works for SEO but it is not always the case. You can use high performing PPC ads to inform content strategy, but be aware that organic search comes with its own challenges so it is always advisable to work with specialists.

    If you would like to work with a digital agency with leading technical staff across both SEO and PPC, Artemis would love to hear from you.

    The post Using PPC data to inform SEO appeared first on Artemis Marketing.


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